IMR Press / FBL / Volume 17 / Issue 1 / DOI: 10.2741/3922

Frontiers in Bioscience-Landmark (FBL) is published by IMR Press from Volume 26 Issue 5 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Frontiers in Bioscience.

Open Access Review
Genetic determinants of acquired cholestasis: a systems biology approach
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1 Department of Clinical and Molecular Hepatology, Institute of Medical Research A Lanari-IDIM, University of Buenos AiresNational Council of Scientific and Technological Research (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina
2 Department of Molecular Genetics and Biology of the Complex Diseases, Institute of Medical Research A Lanari-IDIM, University of Buenos Aires-National Council of Scientific and Technological Research (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina
Academic Editor:Marcelo Gabriel Roma
Front. Biosci. (Landmark Ed) 2012, 17(1), 206–220; https://doi.org/10.2741/3922
Published: 1 January 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Experimental and clinical cholestasis)
Abstract

Cholestatic liver diseases encompass a complex spectrum of intrahepatic and cholangiocellular cholestasis, whose etiologies include genetic and environmental components. This review focuses on the role of the genetic component of three adult cholestatic diseases, namely, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). In particular, we integrate genomic, molecular, and physiological data to understand the putative interplay between the underlying genetic mechanisms involved in the susceptibility of these diseases. This approach is based on the hypothesis that a more integrative knowledge of the genetic determinants of cholestatic diseases may have a strong impact on the development of improved therapies. We also propose the strategy of gene prioritization to identity potential candidate genes for disease susceptibility, and show some examples of "leading genes of human cholestatic pathways". Finally, based on the hypothesis that common physiologic processes and molecular networks may influence the risk of adult cholestatic diseases, we used a candidate gene prioritization application based on the use of a protein-protein interaction network as part of the 'interactome'.

Keywords
Cholestatic disorders
System Biology
Integrative Genetics
Gene Prioritization
Review
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