IMR Press / JOMH / Volume 16 / Issue SP1 / DOI: 10.15586/jomh.v16iSP1.271

Journal of Men’s Health (JOMH) is published by IMR Press from Volume 17 Issue 1 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Dougmar Publishing Group.

Open Access Editorial

USE OF TESTOSTERONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY MIGHT KILL TWO BIRDS WITH ONE STONE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF MEN’S HEALTH AND DISEASE CONTROL 

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1 Department of Urology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea
2 Departments of Urology, College of Medicine, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, South Korea
3 Department of Urology, Biomedical Research Institute of Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Mens. Health 2020, 16(SP1), 52–56; https://doi.org/10.15586/jomh.v16iSP1.271
Submitted: 4 May 2020 | Accepted: 5 June 2020 | Published: 6 July 2020
Abstract

Testosterone plays an important role in promoting the differentiation and stimulation of prostate epithelial cells. Adding to the basic physiology of testosterone, several studies led to the dissemination of the historical androgen hypothesis that higher circulating androgen levels promote prostate cancer cell growth and make the tumor more aggressive. Whereas, the prostate saturation model accounted for the androgen sensitivity of testosterone stimulation in the prostate up to a saturation point, which occurred near the level of castration. Testosterone is related to prostate cancer metabolism in a complex manner; however, within the reference range, high or normal testosterone levels are expected to maintain benign and malignant prostate cells in a differentiated state. Accumulating evidence has suggested that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) might prevent the development of prostate cancer and even reduce prostate cancer risk. There is no change in the clinical guidelines to be followed when considering TRT in patients with a history of prostate cancer, but it is necessary for the physician to inform patients of the positive effects of TRT on male health and prostate cancer. 

Keywords
Testosterone
Prostatic Cancer
Men’s Health
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