IMR Press / JOMH / Volume 16 / Issue 3 / DOI: 10.15586/jomh.v16i3.198

Journal of Men’s Health (JOMH) is published by IMR Press from Volume 17 Issue 1 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Dougmar Publishing Group.

Open Access Original Research

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INTERVENTION CONTENT TO ENHANCE HIV  PRE-EXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS UPTAKE AMONG MEN WHO HAVE SEX  WITH MEN RECEIVING CARE AT SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE CLINICS

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1 Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA
2 Department of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
3 Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Mens. Health 2020, 16(3), 47–59; https://doi.org/10.15586/jomh.v16i3.198
Submitted: 18 October 2019 | Accepted: 24 July 2020 | Published: 3 September 2020
Abstract

Background and objective

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) uptake has been suboptimal. Sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics provide important opportunities to scale PrEP uptake.

Material and methods 

To inform the development of a brief intervention to enhance PrEP uptake in STD clinics, we conducted 32 qualitative interviews to explore barriers and facilitators of PrEP uptake among PrEP eligible, PrEP naïve, and men who have sex with men (MSM) presenting for STD screening services. We also solicited input for intervention components to enhance PrEP uptake at STD clinics.

Results

Most participants’ self-perceived HIV risks were low despite reporting unprotected anal intercourse. Many were reluctant to take any medications, expressed apprehension about perceived side effects of PrEP, and were unaware of how to obtain PrEP. Participants recommended that interventions focusing on enhancing PrEP uptake in STD clinics should include: culturally tailored educational materials about PrEP, informational graphics indicating PrEP’s relative efficacy in reducing HIV transmission risks, and comprehensive PrEP navigation. Most participants did not feel strongly about gender, race or ethnicity of providers; however, nearly all preferred gay-affirming providers. Brief interventions to enhance PrEP uptake among MSM in STD clinics should include efforts to raise self-awareness of HIV risk, provide information about PrEP’s efficacy relative to other interventions, underscore PrEP’s relatively few side effects, and provide culturally tailored messaging.

Keywords
intervention
men who have sex with men (MSM)
pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)
uptake
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