IMR Press / FBE / Volume 2 / Issue 2 / DOI: 10.2741/E133

Frontiers in Bioscience-Elite (FBE) is published by IMR Press from Volume 13 Issue 2 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Frontiers in Bioscience.

Open Access Article
Italy-Japan agreement and discrepancies in diagnosis of superficial gastric lesions
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1 Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, Division of Pathological Anatomy and Histopathology, University of Siena, Italy
2 Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, University Hospital, Siena
3 Surgery and Bioengineering Department, University of Siena
4 Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, Division of Pathological Anatomy and Histopathology, University of Siena
5 Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, Division of Pathological Anatomy and Histopathology, University of Siena
6 Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, University Hospital, Siena
7 Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
8 Clinical Laboratory Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo
9 Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, Division of Pathological Anatomy and Histopathology, University of Siena

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Academic Editor: Antonio Giordano

Front. Biosci. (Elite Ed) 2010, 2(2), 733–738; https://doi.org/10.2741/E133
Published: 1 January 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gene targets for modulating cell growth)
Abstract

The agreement between Italian and Japanese endoscopists and pathologists on endoscopic and histopathological diagnoses of superficial gastric lesions is verified with the use of Paris and Vienna classifications. The correlations between Paris endoscopic types and Vienna histopathological categories is high in both the independent Italian and Japanese evaluations. However, the agreement between Italian and Japanese endoscopists is moderate due to the difficult evaluation of the height of the lesions, in particular when they are mixed. The agreement on the size of the lesions is fairly good. The probability of the same allocation to the Vienna categories of a single case is 87%, disagreements remaining in dysplasia grading, between dysplasia, not only high-grade but also low-grade, and in situ carcinoma, and on cancer invasion of the lamina propria. The results indicate that use of the Paris and Vienna classifications has reduced the discrepancies between Western and Japanese endoscopists and pathologists in the diagnosis of these lesions.

Keywords
Superficial Gastric Lesions
Endoscopy
Histopathology
Paris And Vienna Classifications
ItalyJapan Agreement
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