IMR Press / FBE / Volume 2 / Issue 1 / DOI: 10.2741/E82

Frontiers in Bioscience-Elite (FBE) is published by IMR Press from Volume 13 Issue 2 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Frontiers in Bioscience.

Open Access Article
A novel dihydroimidazoline, trans-Pro mimetic analog is a selective PK/PBAN agonist
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1 Areawide Pest Management Research, Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture, College Station, TX 77845, USA
2 Department of Entomology, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
3 Institute of Organic Chemistry, Technical University of Lodz, 90-924 Lodz, Poland
4 Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Academic Editor: Anna Di Cosmo

Front. Biosci. (Elite Ed) 2010, 2(1), 195–203; https://doi.org/10.2741/E82
Published: 1 January 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developmental and neuronal plasticity)
Abstract

The pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PK/PBAN) family plays a significant role in the regulation of reproductive and developmental processes in a variety of insects. A transPro, type I beta-turn has been previously identified as important for the activity of PK/PBAN peptides. A PK/PBAN analog (PPK-Jo) incorporating a novel dihydroimidazole transPro mimetic motif was evaluated in four PK/PBAN bioassays (pheromonotropic, melanotropic, pupariation and hindgut myotropic). PPK-Jo proved to be a pure, selective melanotropic agonist in S. littoralis. The melanotropic receptor in S. littoralis demonstrates more tolerance to deviations from the ideal transPro structure than those of other PK/PBAN assays. The selective PK/PBAN agonist represents a new tool to better understand the endogenous mechanisms of these peptides and serves as a probe of the plasticity of PK/PBAN regulated systems and receptors. The dihydroimidazoline moiety is shown to function as a surrogate for a transPro in certain circumstances, and provides a novel scaffold with which to construct mimetic PK/PBAN analogs with enhanced selectivity and the potential to disrupt critical physiological processes in insect pests.

Keywords
PBAN
Sex Pheromone Biosynthesis
Cuticular Melanization
Insect Neuropeptide Agonist
Noctuid Moths
Plasticity
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