IMR Press / FBE / Volume 11 / Issue 1 / DOI: 10.2741/E849

Frontiers in Bioscience-Elite (FBE) is published by IMR Press from Volume 13 Issue 2 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Frontiers in Bioscience.

Open Access Article
Beta1-adrenergic receptor antibodies in children with dilated cardiomyopathy
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1 Pediatric Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation Unit. Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid, Spain
2 Pediatric Nephrology and Dialysis Unit. Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid, Spain
Send correspondence to: Manuela Camino, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Calle Dr. Esquerdo, 46, 28007 Madrid, Spain, Tel: 34-639131568, E-mail: manuelacamino59@gmail.com
Front. Biosci. (Elite Ed) 2019, 11(1), 102–108; https://doi.org/10.2741/E849
Published: 1 January 2019
Abstract

Autoantibodies to beta-1 adrenergic receptor have been reported in adult patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Removal of these antibodies has a positive hemodynamic effect. Our aim was to investigate whether these antibodies are present in children with DCM and explore the potential hemodynamic benefit of immunoadsorption (IA). Seventeen children with DCM were tested for these antibodies. The etiology of DCM was genetic (n = 5), myocarditis (n = 4), DCM and congenital heart block (n = 3), DCM associated to maternal lupus (n = 1), DCM and Wolff Parkinson White Syndrome (n = 1), and idiopathic (n = 3). All patients evidenced ventricular dysfunction. Antibody testing was positive in 8 patients, 7 received IA. Three patients with high titers had a poor clinical outcome and needed transplantation. Two patients with low titers exhibited a full recovery of heart function. One patient with multiple myocarditis episodes was treated with immunoglobulin IgG and IA ; after 5 years this patient presented a LVEF of 40 percent. Beta-1 adrenergic receptors autoantibodies are present in children with DCM. Immunoadsorption therapy may help improve heart failure in this context.

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