IMR Press / FBE / Volume 10 / Issue 3 / DOI: 10.2741/E836

Frontiers in Bioscience-Elite (FBE) is published by IMR Press from Volume 13 Issue 2 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Frontiers in Bioscience.

Open Access Article

Bariatric surgery drives major rearrangements of the intestinal microbiota including the biofilm composition

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1 Institute for Maternal and Child Health IRCCS, Burlo Garofolo, Via dell’ Istria 65/1, Trieste, 34137 Italy
2 Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University Hospital of Trieste, Strada di Fiume 447, 34149 Trieste, Italy
3 General Surgery Clinic, ASUITS, Strada di Fiume 447, 34149 Trieste, Italy
4 Clinica Patologie del Fegato, ASUITS, Strada di Fiume 447, 34149 Trieste, Italy

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Front. Biosci. (Elite Ed) 2018, 10(3), 495–505; https://doi.org/10.2741/E836
Published: 1 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial biofilm: when unity is strength)
Abstract

The intestinal microbiota disequilibrium has been associated with obesity, while the role of the gut mucosal biofilms in this pathology is still unknown. We analysed the changes in the intestinal microbiota of obese patients after bariatric surgery with the aim of disclosing the rearrangement of the biofilm configuration. Although the bariatric surgery drives major rearrangements of the gut microbiota, obese patients maintain the Prevotella enterotype before and after surgery, as shown by normal weight patients, with an increase of Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides uniformis. The Bacteroides enterotype guarantees the strong ability to form a biofilm which allows a more efficient digestion of polysaccharides than planktonic communities and leads to the production of acetate which is a key player to inhibit enteropathogens. Additionally, the laparoscopic gastric bypass induces an increase of Hafnia alvei (Proteobacteria), a facultative anaerobic bacterium involved in intestinal and inflammatory disorders. Bariatric surgery influences the microbial composition of gut biofilm. Further studies are needed to elucidate the impact of this variation on recovery after surgery and on weight loss.

Keywords
Biofilm
Gut
Microbiota
Obesity
Bariatric Surgery
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