IMR Press / EJGO / Volume 38 / Issue 2 / DOI: 10.12892/ejgo3418.2017

European Journal of Gynaecological Oncology (EJGO) is published by IMR Press from Volume 40 Issue 1 (2019). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with S.O.G.

Open Access Original Research
Anatomical variations of the obturator veins and their surgical implications
Show Less
1 First Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Târgu-Mureş, Romania
2 Department of Surgery, Sfântul Constantin Hospital, Braşov, Romania
3 Second Clinic of Surgery, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Târgu-Mureş, Romania
4 Clinic of Oto-Rino-Laringology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Târgu-Mureş, Romania
Eur. J. Gynaecol. Oncol. 2017, 38(2), 263–265; https://doi.org/10.12892/ejgo3418.2017
Published: 10 April 2017
Abstract

Purpose of investigation: The obturator veins and their network contribute to major bleeding complications during gynaecologic surgery. Materials and Methods: The anatomical variations of the obturator veins were studied on 106 patients in which a thorough bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed. Results: Symmetrical drainage on right and left sides was found in 75 cases: only in internal iliac vein in 32 cases, both in external iliac vein and internal in 41 cases, and only in external in two cases (so called "pubic vein"). In 31 procedures, asymmetric drainage was found between the two sides: one side in internal, the other side both in internal and external in 25 patients; in three patients, in external on one side and in both internal and external on the other; and in external on one side and in internal on the other side in one patient. Conclusions: Anatomical variations of the obturator veins appear quite often.
Keywords
Obturator veins
Corona mortis
Anatomical variations
Gynaecologic surgery
Share
Back to top