IMR Press / EJGO / Volume 29 / Issue 3 / pii/1630995586186-1836027271

European Journal of Gynaecological Oncology (EJGO) is published by IMR Press from Volume 40 Issue 1 (2019). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with S.O.G.

Open Access Original Research
Clinical implication of medroxyprogesterone acetate against advanced ovarian carcinoma: a pilot study
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1 Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu-City
2 Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu-City (Japan)
3 Division of Complementary and Alternative Healthcare, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii (USA)
Eur. J. Gynaecol. Oncol. 2008, 29(3), 252–255;
Published: 10 June 2008
Abstract

Purpose of investigation: The present study was performed to identify the effects of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) plus adjuvant chemotherapy on advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (FIGO Stage III/IV). Methods: A total of 50 patients were enrolled in this study. A relatively low dose of MPA (200 mg/day) after surgery was administered in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy and the treatment was continued for two years. Patients' backgrounds were also analyzed. Results: Relapse-free survival (p < 0.05) and overall survival (p < 0.001) rates in FIGO Stage III/IV ovarian cancer patients with MPA combined chemotherapy were significantly longer than the control group. The effect was more prominent in the higher progesterone receptor expression group. The chemotherapy regimens (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and cisplatin vs paraplatin plus cyclophosphamide or paclitaxel) did not affect prognosis. Conclusion: MPA with platinum-based chemotherapy as an adjuvant therapy might improve the prognosis in FIGO Stage III/IV epithelial ovarian cancer cases. A randomized controlled study is still needed for further analyses.
Keywords
Medroxyprogesterone acetate
Progesterone receptor
Ovarian cancer
Survival
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