IMR Press / EJGO / Volume 21 / Issue 3 / pii/2000157

European Journal of Gynaecological Oncology (EJGO) is published by IMR Press from Volume 40 Issue 1 (2019). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with S.O.G.

Open Access Original Research

Intensive-dose ifosfamide and etoposide with filgrastim for cytoreduction before peripheral blood stem cell collection in patients with advanced ovarian cancer

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1 Departments of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
2 Department of Gynecologic Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
3 Division of Phannacy, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Eur. J. Gynaecol. Oncol. 2000, 21(3), 241–244;
Published: 10 June 2000
Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the antitumor activity and toxic effects of intensive-dose ifosfamide plus etoposide with filgrastim given as stem cell mobilization therapy before high-dose chemotherapy for recurrent or persistent ovarian cancer. Methods: We studied 32 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer who had a positive second-look Iaparatomy or recurrent disease. Ifosfamide was given at 10 g/m2 (total dose) by continuous infusion over 72 h; etoposide was given at 150 mg/m2 in 2 h infusions every 12 h during the same 72 h period; and filgrastim was given at 10 µg/kg/day subcutaneous injection from day 5 through com­pletion of stem cell harvest. Results: Nine (64%) of the 14 patients assessed responded to the treatment. The target stem cell dose was achieved with a median of I apheresis (range 1-5 aphereses). Nonhematologic toxicity was limited to grade 2 nephrotoxicity in one patient and grade 2 hepatic toxicity in three patients. Conclusions: In this patient group, intensive-dose ifosfamide plus etoposide with filgrastim was well tolerated and produced anti­tumor activity.

Keywords
Ovarian cancer
Stem cells
lfosfamide
Etoposide
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