IMR Press / JOMH / Volume 16 / Issue 2 / DOI: 10.15586/jomh.v16i2.221

Journal of Men’s Health (JOMH) is published by IMR Press from Volume 17 Issue 1 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Dougmar Publishing Group.

Open Access Original Research

SHORTAGE OF MALE NURSING STUDENTS: THE EXPERIENCE OF A GROWING NURSING PROGRAM

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1 School of Nursing, Sam Houston State University
2 Department of Population Health, Sam Houston State University
3 Department of Kinesiology, Sam Houston State University
J. Mens. Health 2020, 16(2), 9–17; https://doi.org/10.15586/jomh.v16i2.221
Submitted: 7 January 2020 | Accepted: 7 April 2020 | Published: 2 May 2020
Abstract

Background and Objective

The shortage of male nurses in the United States is a well-known phenomenon that the nursing aca-demia is trying to remedy. This case study examines the experience of a new southwest US nursing program in its recruitment and retention of male nursing students. In the process, the case study will attempt to explore insights on opportunities to improve nursing workforce policies to better attract male recruits into the profession.

Methods

Data related to application, enrollment, and retention were retrieved and merged from the school’s application and enrollment systems. Overall, 978 students were enrolled from 2011 to 2019, with 837 females and 141 males. For applications, from 2014 to 2018, there were 2185 applicants, with 1879 females and 306 males. Statistical analyses were done using SPSS version 25 (IBM). Results are shown as means±standard deviation. 

Results

Results show that 14% of the applicants to the program were male, while 14.4% of the enrollees were male. In terms of retention, males had lower (73.8%) retention rates than females (83.9%), although it is not statistically significant (p=0.08). On average, there were significantly fewer male applicants and enrollees (p<0.001) than females, and the differences are getting larger (p<0.001).

Conclusion

Nursing shortage and, more specifically, the lack of male nurses is a well-known phenomenon in healthcare. Nursing schools have attempted to diversify enrollment through the recruitment of more male nursing students; however, their efforts seem to have hit a barrier with a continued shortage of male applicants. To change outcomes, the nursing profession and academia should consider providing more community education and outreach programs targeting students and their parents earlier in their academic careers.

Keywords
baccalaureate
education
male
nurses
nursing
students
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