IMR Press / JOMH / Volume 16 / Issue 2 / DOI: 10.15586/jomh.v16i2.170

Journal of Men’s Health (JOMH) is published by IMR Press from Volume 17 Issue 1 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Dougmar Publishing Group.

Open Access Original Research

CELL PHONE ADDICTION AND APPS ACTIVITIES AMONG CHINESE MEDICAL STUDENTS: PREVALENCE AND RISK FACTORS

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1 School of Health Service, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China
2 School of Health Services Management, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China
3 School of Public Health Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China
J. Mens. Health 2020, 16(2), 27–38; https://doi.org/10.15586/jomh.v16i2.170
Submitted: 5 August 2019 | Accepted: 19 April 2020 | Published: 8 June 2020
Abstract

Objective

To investigate the prevalence of cell phone addiction and the association with apps use and preference among medical students in China to offer suggestions for phone addiction prevention and management.

Methods

A total of 3058 medical undergraduate students from six medical universities/colleges located in five provinces of China were randomly sampled and interviewed. An adapted “Questionnaire of Mobile APP” from “Manolis/Roberts Cell-Phone Addiction Scale” was used to conduct the interview. Chi-squared (χ2) test and binary logistic regression analysis were used for data analysis. A database was built with EpiData 3.1, and statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 23.0.

Results

Cell phone addiction was reported by 16.25% of medial undergraduates. Univariate analysis found statistical difference among addictive students with different genders, hukou status, monthly cell phone bills and in-love status. The following were reported as the risk factors for mobile addiction among medical students by logistic regression analysis: medical students who were female (odds ratio [OR]=1.704, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.386, 2.095), were from urban (OR=1.307, 95% CI=1.046, 1.634), had boyfriend or girlfriend (OR=1.333, 95% CI=1.080, 1.646), used reading apps (OR=1.254, 95% CI=1.015, 1.549), were using reading apps (OR=1.254, 95% CI=1.015, 1.549), and were using chat apps (OR=2.222 , 95% CI=1.146, 4.310).

Conclusion

Medical students who are female, from urban, in-love, or frequent users of reading and chat apps may face a higher risk of cell phone addiction. Therefore, gender-specific and app type-specific interven-tions should be developed to intervene college students’ cell phone addiction.

Keywords
medical students
mobile phone addiction
APP
affect factors
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