IMR Press / JIN / Volume 21 / Issue 5 / DOI: 10.31083/j.jin2105131
Open Access Original Research
Adaptation of Optokinetic Reflex by Training with Different Frequency and Amplitude
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1 Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Research Institute of Medical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine, 05030 Seoul, Republic of Korea
2 Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 08826 Seoul, Republic of Korea
3 Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 08826 Seoul, Republic of Korea
4 Memory Network Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 08826 Seoul, Republic of Korea
5 Neuroscience Research Institute, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 03080 Seoul, Republic of Korea
*Correspondence: 20110552@kuh.ac.kr (Chang-Hee Kim)
Academic Editor: Rafael Franco
J. Integr. Neurosci. 2022, 21(5), 131; https://doi.org/10.31083/j.jin2105131
Submitted: 29 March 2021 | Revised: 24 April 2022 | Accepted: 5 May 2022 | Published: 22 July 2022
Copyright: © 2022 The Author(s). Published by IMR Press.
This is an open access article under the CC BY 4.0 license.
Abstract

Background: Although the occurrence of optokinetic reflex (OKR) adaptation after OKR training is well established, the dynamic properties of OKR adaptation has not been fully studied. This study aimed to examine the difference in the amount of OKR adaptation according to OKR training protocols which have different frequency or amplitude of drum oscillation. Methods: Using C57BL/6N male mice, we induced OKR adaptation by 3 different categories of learning paradigm as follows: (1) Optokinetic drum oscillation for 60 min with same amplitude and different frequency. (2) Optokinetic drum oscillation for 60 min with same frequency and different amplitude. (3) Training with serial combination of different frequency or amplitude. Results: The results show that the amount of OKR adaptation was greater after OKR training with lower frequency or amplitude than that with higher frequency or amplitude. Conclusions: This finding may suggest that the retinal slip signal with lower-velocity OKR stimulation serves as more precise instructive signal for learning, leading to induction of more efficient training effect. Another interesting finding was that the OKR gain increase tended to be greater after training composed of sequential combination of decreasing frequency or amplitude than that composed of sequential combination of increasing frequency or amplitude. Furthermore, the OKR training with high frequency or amplitude eliminated a part of learning effects which have already formed by previous training. We postulate that the stimulation during training with high frequency or amplitude may implement a disturbing instruction for OKR learning when it is conducted in mice with increased OKR gain after previous OKR training.

Keywords
optokinetic reflex
cerebellum
motor learning
adaptation
training paradigm
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