IMR Press / JIN / Volume 18 / Issue 3 / DOI: 10.31083/j.jin.2019.03.183
Open Access Original Research
fNIRS correlates of the development of inhibitory control in young obese subjects
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1 Graduate School, Wuhan Sports University, Wuhan, 430079, P. R. China
2 Hubei Key Laboratory of Sport Training and Monitoring, College of Health Science, Wuhan Sports University, Wuhan, 430079, P. R. China

These authors contributed equally.

J. Integr. Neurosci. 2019, 18(3), 253–259; https://doi.org/10.31083/j.jin.2019.03.183
Submitted: 17 June 2019 | Accepted: 23 August 2019 | Published: 30 September 2019
Abstract

Executive functions are closely related to the prefrontal cortex, and inhibitory control is an important component of executive functioning. Previous studies have found that inhibitory control continues to develop after adolescence and that obesity is associated with executive functions. However, few studies have addressed whether obesity affects the development of inhibitory control. Hence, we focused on whether inhibitory control continues to develop after adolescence in obese individuals. We used a Stroop task to measure the inhibitory control of young obese subjects, and monitored accompanying brain activation by functional near-infrared spectroscopy technology. The findings suggest that brain activation due to Stroop interference does not increase with age in obese subjects and that early prevention of executive function deficit is recommended.

Keywords
Obesity
inhibitory control
development
fNIRS
Stroop color-word task
frontal cortical function
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