IMR Press / FBL / Volume 9 / Issue 2 / DOI: 10.2741/1317

Frontiers in Bioscience-Landmark (FBL) is published by IMR Press from Volume 26 Issue 5 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Frontiers in Bioscience.

Open Access Article

Mn2+ and bacterial pathogenesis

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1 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
2 Biotechnology Laboratory, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
3 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
4 Chlamydia Research Laboratory, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Academic Editor:Michael Maguire
Front. Biosci. (Landmark Ed) 2004, 9(2), 1035–1042; https://doi.org/10.2741/1317
Published: 1 May 2004
Abstract

Fe2+ has traditionally been considered the most important divalent cation involved in host-pathogen interactions. However, recent research indicates a previously unappreciated role for transition metal divalent cations other than Fe2+ during infection. Recent studies have identified an absolute requirement for Mn2+ in bacterial pathogens that are Fe2+-independent, indicating an important role for Mn2+ in pathogenesis. Potential roles for Mn2+ in pathogenesis include effects on the detoxification of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), as a cofactor for enzymes involved in intermediary metabolism and signal transduction, and as a stimulus for virulence gene regulation. This review focuses on how these possible roles for Mn2+ may affect bacterial pathogenesis and the outcome of an infection.

Keywords
Bacteria
Microorganisms
Manganese
Bacterial Pathogenesis
MnSOD
catalase
mntH
sitABCD
Fur
MntR
Review
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