IMR Press / FBL / Volume 4 / Issue 3 / DOI: 10.2741/tabibzad

Frontiers in Bioscience-Landmark (FBL) is published by IMR Press from Volume 26 Issue 5 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Frontiers in Bioscience.

Open Access Article
An experimental model for the endometriosis in athymic mice
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1 Department of Pathology, North Shore University Hospital, Biomedical Research Center, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Pennsylvania State University Medical Center, Hershey, PA 17033
Front. Biosci. (Landmark Ed) 1999, 4(3), 4–9; https://doi.org/10.2741/tabibzad
Published: 1 July 1999
Abstract

Endometriosis is an adhesion disorder characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue in ectopic sites outside the uterus. The disease is associated with dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain and infertility. Although endometriosis is the most common gynecologic disorder, relatively little is known regarding its etiology, pathogenesis and the course of the disease. This situation is primarily due to the absence of experimental systems to examine the mechanism of endometrial cell adhesion, role of inflammatory cells and the interactions of epithelial, and stromal cells with the peritoneum and ovarian tissue leading to the development of this disorder. Dissociated human endometrial cells were suspended in peritoneal fluids of individuals with and without endometriosis and were injected into the peritoneal cavity of athymic mice. This led to development of ectopic adhesions of endometrial cells at the peritoneal and ovarian surfaces. Endometrial cells which were marked with fluorescent lipophylic dyes, prior to intraperitoneal injection, could be visualized without surgery at such sites. The studies demonstrate a model for endometriosis in athymic mice.

Keywords
Human
Endometrium
Endometriosis
Technique
Nude mouse
Adhesions
Peritoneum
Ovary
Trauma
Fat
Spleen
Pancreas
Liver
Skin
Fat
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