IMR Press / FBL / Volume 16 / Issue 2 / DOI: 10.2741/3695

Frontiers in Bioscience-Landmark (FBL) is published by IMR Press from Volume 26 Issue 5 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Frontiers in Bioscience.

Open Access Article
Receptor-mediated T cell absorption of antigen presenting cell-derived molecules
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1 Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. inkyu@scripps.edu
Academic Editor:Inkyu Hwang
Front. Biosci. (Landmark Ed) 2011, 16(2), 411–421; https://doi.org/10.2741/3695
Published: 1 January 2011
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ligand uptake by immune cells; mechanism and significance)
Abstract

T cells tend to acquire a variety of cell surface molecules derived from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The molecule uptake occurs mainly during direct T/APC contact and is instigated by specific receptor/ligand interactions, such as T cell receptor (TCR) with a cognate peptide/MHC complex (pMHC) or CD28 with B7. The acquired molecules are targeted for internalization and degradation in the lysosome. Nevertheless, those molecules are expressed on the surface of T cells for a period of time. The presentation of APC-derived ligands by T cells exhibited a multitude of immunological effects via antigen-specific T/T interaction upon recognition of the absorbed antigens by contact with other T cells. Ligand uptake also occurs via absorption of membrane vesicles shed from APCs prior to contact (e.g., exosomes and plasma membrane-derived vesicles). As in ligand absorption via direct T/APC interaction, the absorption of pre-formed membrane vesicles is also dependent on specific receptor/ligand interactions. In this review, biological mechanisms underlying the ligand absorption process as well as the biological significance and application of the event will be discussed.

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