IMR Press / FBE / Volume 2 / Issue 4 / DOI: 10.2741/E208

Frontiers in Bioscience-Elite (FBE) is published by IMR Press from Volume 13 Issue 2 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Frontiers in Bioscience.

Open Access Article
Functional and metabolic adaptation in uraemic cardiomyopathy
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1 Department of Biological Sciences and Hull York Medical School, University of Hull, Kingston-upon-Hull, United Kingdom
2 Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
3 Department of Renal Medicine, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospital NHS Trust, Kingston-upon-Hull, United Kingdom
Academic Editor:Sunil Bhandari
Front. Biosci. (Elite Ed) 2010, 2(4), 1492–1501; https://doi.org/10.2741/E208
Published: 1 June 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cardiac remodelling in uraemic heart disease)
Abstract

Cardiovascular complications are the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The uraemic heart undergoes substantial remodelling, including left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), an important determinant of heart failure. LVH results in a shift in myocardial substrate oxidation from fatty acids towards carbohydrates however, whether this metabolic adaptation occurs in the uraemic heart is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the progression of kidney dysfunction in parallel with cardiac remodelling in experimental uraemia. Experimental uraemia was induced surgically via a subtotal nephrectomy. At 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery, renal function, LVH, in vitro cardiac function and metabolic remodelling using 13C-NMR were assessed. Uraemic animals exhibited anaemia and kidney dysfunction at 3 weeks, with further deterioration as uraemia progressed. By 12 weeks, uraemic hearts showed marked LVH, preserved cardiac function and markedly reduced fatty acid oxidation. This change in substrate preference may contribute to the deterioration of cardiac function in the uraemic heart and ultimately failure.

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