IMR Press / EJGO / Volume 42 / Issue 5 / DOI: 10.31083/j.ejgo4205146
Open Access Review
Immune response in cervical intraepithelial neoplasms
Show Less
1 Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Research Institute of Oncology (IPON), Federal University of Triângulo Mineiro, 38025-440 Uberaba, Brazil
Eur. J. Gynaecol. Oncol. 2021, 42(5), 973–981; https://doi.org/10.31083/j.ejgo4205146
Submitted: 9 May 2021 | Revised: 8 July 2021 | Accepted: 20 July 2021 | Published: 15 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immunology in Gynecological Cancer)
Abstract

Objective: The current study aims perform a comprehensive overview of the topic immune response in cervical intraepithelial neoplasms, summarizing the findings of literature. Data sources: PubMed database. Methods of study selection: A search for the following descriptors was performed in the PubMed database: descriptor “immune response in cervical cancer and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)”; “immunotherapy in premalignant cervical lesions”. Tabulation, integration and results: The articles identified were published between 1967 and 2021. We selected 85 articles for review on the subject (reference 16 onwards). This literature review shows the important role that the immune system plays in the development and progression of cervical cancer. Immune response in pre-neoplastic cervical lesions includes host defense mechanisms against the HPV, adaptive immunity and the function of cytokines. Predictive factors of viral persistence and progression of premalignant lesions may also be associated with immune response. Conclusion: One of the determining factors for the persistence or elimination of HPV infections and their evolution to pre-neoplastic lesions is the cellular immune response, as the progression or regression of the tumor depends on the type and amount of cytokines secreted by the body. The investigation of these immune reactions may provide new therapeutic targets for cervical intraepithelial neoplasms.

Keywords
Cervical intraepithelial neoplasms
Immune response
Cervical cancer
Human Papilloma Virus
Immunotherapy
Figures
Fig. 1.
Share
Back to top