IMR Press / CEOG / Volume 44 / Issue 1 / DOI: 10.12891/ceog3434.2017

Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology (CEOG) is published by IMR Press from Volume 46 Issue 1 (2019). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with S.O.G.

Open Access Original Research
Comparison of GnRH antagonist and agonist mini-dose long protocols in infertile cases undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation
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1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Süleymaniye Research and Education Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sakarya University School of Medicine, Sakarya Research and Education Hospital, Sakarya, Turkey
3 Faculty of Health Sciences, Aydın University, Istanbul, Turkey
4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gaziosmanpaşa Taksim Research and Education Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
5 Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Yeni Ufuk Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
6 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Istanbul Research and Education Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
7 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zeynep Kamil Research and Education Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
Clin. Exp. Obstet. Gynecol. 2017, 44(1), 116–121; https://doi.org/10.12891/ceog3434.2017
Published: 10 February 2017
Abstract

Aim: The purpose of the present study was to determine if there is a difference between multi-dose gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol and long GnRH agonist protocol. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study compared the data pertaining to patients chosen as per predetermined acceptance criteria, 113 of whom were administered multi-dose antagonist protocol for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) while 133 were administered long agonist protocol for COH at Suleymaniye Teaching Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Results: While cancellation rate was found to be significantly higher in antagonist group (17.7% vs 11.28%), the number of follicles > 14 mm and > 16 mm, E2 level, and the number of retrieved oocytes on the day of hCG trigger were significantly lower in the same group. However, there was no difference between fertilization rates and embryonic development rates. The pregnancy rates per transfer and per cycle were found to be 40.9% and 31.7%, respectively; in the antagonist group they were lower, though not significantly, when compared to agonist group (44.1% and 39.1%, respectively). Ongoing pregnancy rates were found to be similar between the groups. Conclusion: GnRH antagonist treatment protocol has a level of efficacy similar to agonist treatment protocol in terms of pregnancy results for all groups.
Keywords
Long GnRH agonist
GnRH antagonist
IVF
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