IMR Press / CEOG / Volume 43 / Issue 4 / DOI: 10.12891/ceog3276.2016

Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology (CEOG) is published by IMR Press from Volume 46 Issue 1 (2019). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with S.O.G.

Open Access Original Research
The comparison of EMG-biofeedback and extracorporeal magnetic innervation treatments in women with urinary incontinence
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1 Abant İzzet Baysal University, School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Bolu
2 Abant İzzet Baysal University,Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bolu (Turkey)
Clin. Exp. Obstet. Gynecol. 2016, 43(4), 550–554; https://doi.org/10.12891/ceog3276.2016
Published: 10 August 2016
Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of EMG-biofeedback (EMG-BF), extracorporeal magnetic innervation (ExMI), and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) treatments on women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Materials and Methods: The study included 67 women with SUI. Pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) were evaluated with electromyography and the quality of life (QoL) with Incontinence Quality of Life (I-QoL) questionnaire; afterwards, the subjects were divided into three groups; EMG-BF group (n=23), ExMI group (n=20), and PFMT group (n=24). EMG-BF group and ExMI group were given training in urogynecological physiotherapy clinic. PFMT group were given eight-week home exercises. Each group was assessed before training and after eight weeks. Results: All three groups showed a significant improvement in EMG activity values and average QoL scores. The greatest improvement was observed in the EMG-BF training group for QoL scores. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that all of the three methods performed with the purpose of increasing PFM strength were effective. The increase in PFM strength reduces incontinence associated symptoms and thus improves QoL.
Keywords
EMG-biofeedback
Extracorporeal magnetic innervation
Pelvic floor muscle training
Urinary incontinence
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