IMR Press / CEOG / Volume 41 / Issue 2 / DOI: 10.12891/ceog16322014

Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology (CEOG) is published by IMR Press from Volume 46 Issue 1 (2019). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with S.O.G.

Open Access Original Research
The effects of magnesium sulphate on the contractile activity of uterus in an animal model of preeclampsia
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1 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
3 Department of Biochemistry
4 Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kırıkkale University, Kırıkkale
5 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University, Rize
6 Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Başkent University Ankara
7 Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kırıkkale University (Turkey)
Clin. Exp. Obstet. Gynecol. 2014, 41(2), 169–173; https://doi.org/10.12891/ceog16322014
Published: 10 April 2014
Abstract

Purpose: This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) on the contractile activity of the uterus in a pregnant rat model of preeclampsia induced by N-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight, 160- 220 gram, three to four month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. After conception was confirmed by vaginal smears on the first day of pregnancy, the animals were allocated into four groups according to the chemicals fed in their drinking water as control (nothing administered), L-NAME (50 mg/kg L-NAME), MgSO4 (600 mg/kg MgSO4), and MgSO4 + L-NAME group (600 mg/kg MgSO4 + 50 mg/kg L-NAME). The pregnant uterus strips were isolated on the 19th day and the contractile activity of uterus was examined by applying 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 2.5 mIU/ml oxytocin to each group and responses are recorded accordingly. Results: There were no statistically significant differences regarding fetal parameters and peak amplitudes of the oxytocin stimulated pregnant rat myometrial strips among groups. In L-NAME group at 0 and 0.1 mIU/ml oxytocin, the contraction frequency in a ten-min period was statistically lower than the control group (Z= -2.850, p = 0.004; Z = -2.902, p = 0.004, respectively). In MgSO4 group only at 0 mIU/ml oxytocin, the frequencies of the contractions in ten-min period were statistically lower than the control group (Z = -2.973, p = 0.003). In L-NAME + MgSO4 group at 0, 0.1 and 0.2 mIU/ml oxytocin concentrations the frequencies of the contractions in ten-min period were statistically lower than the control group (Z = - 4.018, p = 0.000; Z= -3.237, p = 0.001; Z= -2.902, p = 0.004, respectively). In L-NAME + MgSO4 given group at each oxytocin concentrations, the frequencies of the contractions in ten-min period were lower but not statistically different than the L-NAME group. Conclusion: MgSO4 has no significant effect on the amplitude of spontaneous or oxytocin induced myometrial contractions, but decreased the frequency of spontaneous contractions. At each doses of oxytocin, MgSO4 has no significant effect on the frequency of contraction in a pregnant rat model of preeclampsia induced by L-NAME.
Keywords
Magnesium sulfate
L-NAME
Uterus
Preeclampsia
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