IMR Press / CEOG / Volume 31 / Issue 4 / pii/2004076

Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology (CEOG) is published by IMR Press from Volume 46 Issue 1 (2019). Previous articles were published by another publisher on a subscription basis, and they are hosted by IMR Press on imrpress.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with S.O.G.

Open Access Original Research

Social aspects of the new assisted reproduction technologies: Attitudes of Israeli gynecologists

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1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rabin medical center, Beilinson Campus, Petah-Tikva (Israel)
2 General Health Services (Sherutei Bri'ut Clalit), Dan-Petah-Tikva district (Israel)
3 Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel)
4 LL.B, LL.M., Doctorate student at the Faculty of Law, Universite Pierre Mendes-France, Grenoble II (France)
Clin. Exp. Obstet. Gynecol. 2004, 31(4), 285–286;
Published: 10 December 2004
Abstract

Aim: To evaluate attitudes of gynecologists as to the social aspects of assisted reproduction technologies. Methods: The survey was sent electronically to 600 gynecologists covering their opinions on impact of reproductive technolo­gies, the role of gynecologists in reshaping social reality, their definition of family, concern for the unborn child, accessibility to the new technologies, and potential partners in the decision-making process. Results: One hundred fifty-five gynecologists completed the questionnaire. The majority agreed that the new reproduction tech­nologies have major social consequences (90.3%); that gynecologists, by putting these technologies to use, play a major role in changing social reality; and that the interests of the unborn child should be taken into consideration (84.5%). More than half included single parents and same-sex couples in the definition of a “family” and believed that fertility treatments should be available to every­one. As to sharing responsibility, 65.2% (n = 101) felt the gynecologist should not be the sole decision-maker regarding the neces­sity of treatment; among them, 49.7% preferred that social workers or psychologists be involved - rather than jurists. Conclusions: The gynecologists in the present survey seemed to be well aware of the importance of the social revolution initiated by the development of assisted reproduction technologies. While they accepted a broader definition of the family, they have not lost sight of the rights of the unborn child and as such, the need for related professionals to take a greater part in the decision­making process. These findings have important implications for educational programs in the health care professions and for future legislation regarding public accessibility to these procedures.

Keywords
Reproduction
Technology
Social
Gynecologist
Attitudes
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